Archive for ‘Uncategorized’



Painting Star Wars, from Ackbar (with a Moustache) to Vader

Steven Daily | April 2, 2014

Steven Daily, Star Wars artist

When I was approached to write a blog for StarWars.com, I was a bit scared. Terrified actually.

I am not a writer at all. To be honest, I am grammatically challenged.

Working for Lucasfilm was a dream come true. I have been a Star Wars fan since my parents took me to see A New Hope in 1978 at the Van Buren drive-in. Little me would be peeing his pants if he knew then that he would work for Star Wars. I have done four art pieces for Lucasfilm. All of them were extremely fun and exciting to make.

I was approached to write this at one of the busiest times I’ve ever had, and I wanted to put it off…BUT…I was working on a new piece for Lucasfilm and Acme Archives, so I thought this would be a perfect chance for me to write a little bit about my process.

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Mark Hamill to Appear at Star Wars Weekends for First Time Ever

Gary Buchanan | March 20, 2014

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His most famous film character has destroyed the Death Star, received the Medal of Bravery following The Battle of Yavin, and resisted a turn to the dark side — so what is he going to do next?

He’s going to Tosche Station to pick up some power converters!

No wait, wrong answer. He’s going to Disney World!

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Star Wars-Inspired Music Guide (Including, Yes, Pipe-Organ Albums)

Mark Newbold | March 20, 2014

Star Wars vinyl albums

I’m going to take you on a journey. A stereo journey. Back to the mid 1970s, when a little fancied sci-fi film called Star Wars changed the world of cinema and exploded into popular culture like Bazooka Joe’s bubble gum. It was a world of 7″ and 12″ vinyl, cassettes, and 8-tracks, when your dad’s music setup was often housed within a sideboard the size of a Morris Marina and when the Walkman was still a long-distant dream. So for kids of the day, desperate for as much Star Wars as they could get their hands, eyes, taste buds, and ears on the music of the film was an evocative and much-prized treasure.

Today the music of Star Wars is as iconic as any aspect of the film, weaving its way into the cultural subconsciousness and launching a thousand imitators. The original soundtrack, a double album with booklet released in May 1977 by 20th Century Records, sold in millions and revived not only the popularity of the orchestral soundtrack but also the mass appeal of movie soundtracks in general. It made a global star of the already Oscar-laden John Williams and, completely incidentally, gave a plethora of artists and labels — some non-licensed — the impetus to go out and record some of their own versions of the films score. In these far savvier days, when a cursory glance at the internet would tell you instantly whether or not you were buying the “real thing” the thought of picking up one of these albums might seem crazy, but when kids were clamoring for anything remotely related to the galaxy’s greatest film these releases sold well.

Here then is a look at just a few of those unique releases, some reasonably well-known (MECO hit number #1 on the Billboard Top 100 with his “Star Wars Theme” and today can be heard over the end credits of all RebelForce Radio shows and some not so much (“The Sounds of Star Wars” by The Sonic All-Stars anyone?)

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Collecting the Galaxy: 15 Years of LEGO Star Wars, Part 2

James Burns | March 19, 2014

LEGO Star Wars logo

In the part one of “15 Years of LEGO Star Wars, I looked at the introduction of the mashup franchise through to the end of 2005 and the release of Star Wars: Episode III Revenge on the Sith. Part two of this retrospective looks at the period between 2006 and 2010 which includes the 10th anniversary of LEGO Star Wars and the introduction of the first sets from Star Wars: The Clone Wars. By the end of 2005 we’d seen 124 sets released which included over 125 different minifigures.

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Star Wars in the UK: An Empire of Erasers

Mark Newbold | March 7, 2014

Star Wars in the UK

Vintage Star Wars erasers

In today’s world, when communication is conducted largely by the tapping of a keyboard and the click of a mouse and deletions are executed by the pressing of the backspace button, excitement over erasers — or rubbers, as we commonly call them here in the UK — may seem odd. But back in the day, when rubbers were among the many cool branded items you could grab at a cheap price that had the characters and vehicles of Star Wars on them, they were an essential purchase. And importantly, they were a great way of showing your love of the movie to your fellow fans at school while pretending to focus on the teacher at the front of the class. We had pencil cases, pens, pencils, rulers, sharpeners, stationary sets, and more, but back in the days when fragrant erasers were still allowed to be sold in the UK, Star Wars erasers were an essential tool in one’s school supplies pouch.

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Star Wars in the UK: Memorabilia, 23-24 November 2013

Mark Newbold | December 13, 2013

Star Wars in the UK

Memorabilia

The eyes of sci-fi and fantasy, anime, and comics fans across the UK turned to Birmingham, the nation’s second city, over the weekend of 23rd and 24th November as Memorabilia returned to Brum for the second time this year, bringing with it stars of screens both large and small, voice actors, sports stars, cult heroes, comic artists, and writers and cosplayers of every ilk. And, as ever, it made for a fascinating two days of fun, color and vibrancy celebrating every facet of fandom.

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Star Wars in the UK: Star Wars Comic Book Annuals

Mark Newbold | November 15, 2013
Back in the 70′s and 80′s the output of Marvel UK was one of the keystones in keeping the spirit of the Star Wars saga alight between the release of the  films, and every year during the festive period kids across the country would be treated to a tradition that’s run from the grandaddy of British comics The Beano in the 30′s right up to the releases of the present day – hardback Annuals.
In the States there were three Star Wars Annuals released in 1979, 1982 and 1983, but the UK was treated to 9 annuals between 1978 and 1985 as well as an Ewoks annual in 1988. Differing from their American cousins the UK Annuals were hardbacks in the traditional UK magazine size and were released by Marvel UK, in conjunction with other specialist companies. Marvel UK was started in 1972 after years of outsourcing the Marvel product to other companies. The success of these titles led to the establishment of Marvel UK, and a fast growing roster of titles incorporating major Marvel US titles and home grown stories by a group of up and coming writers and artists including Alan Davis and Alan Moore.
The first Star Wars annual, released in conjunction with Brown Watson, was a 63 page reprint of the classic adaptation of the first film, still known simply as Star Wars, by Roy Thomas and Howard Chaykin. Originally published in the first 12 issues of Star Wars Weekly the annual was a common gift across the country, being read and re-read numerous times by ravenous fans who had a limited amount of product to devour. In these days of weekly Dark Horse releases it’s hard to imagine reading and re-reading a title but, no slight to Dark Horse intended, back in ’78 we only had that 6 issue comic and the few issues that had been released afterwards consisting mostly of a controversial green Lepus carnivorus.  I know that when I got to the final page I would often go right back to the start and begin again.
1979′s second Star Wars annual, released by Grandreams was a reprint of Star Wars Weekly issues 25 and 26, which itself reprinted the US Marvel issue 13 “Day of the Dragon Lords” and Star Wars Weekly 27 and 28 which reprinted US issue 14 “The Sound of Armageddon”.  Written by the legendary Archie Goodwin and drawn by Star Wars stalwart Carmine Infantino, it saw out the decade on a wave of high adventure.
1980 brought not only the second chapter in the Star Wars saga, The Empire Strikes Back but also it’s comic adaptation, released by Marvel/Grandreams.  Released initially as issues 118 – 135 of Star Wars Weekly (which reprinted US Star Wars issues 39 – 44) the 63 page Annual, written by Archie Goodwin and drawn by two of George Lucas’ favourite artists Al Williamson and Carlos Garzon, brought not only the stunning story of the second Star Wars epic to the Annual format, but also some intriguing glimpses into an early, impish and purple version of Master Yoda before Stuart Freeborn had completed his magic and Williamson redrew the character for later versions of the adaptation. Wrapped behind a beautiful and distinctive Bob Larkin cover I have hugely fond memories of this annual as it was the last gift I’d recieve from my Grandmother, who passed away in late 1981.  As with many Star Wars releases of this era, they come with some very special attachments.
The Empire Strikes Back and Star Wars were both honoured with Annuals in 1981, with the Empire Annual reprinting the J.M. DeMatteis and Carmine Infantino story “The Dreams of Cody Sunn-Childe” from issue 46 of the US Marvel run and issue 141 of the UK Empire Strikes Back Monthly along with Archie Goodwin, Al Williamson and Walt Simonsons “The Crimson Forever” from US issue 50 and printed in the UK for the first time.   Both quirky tales, they were complimented in ’81 by the return of the Star Wars Annual, which featured three stories.  ”The Third Law” from US Star Wars issue 48, “Death Probe” from US Issue 45 and the classic “Droid World” (which would soon be adapted into a Read-Along-Adventure by Buena Vista, as I discussed in my Read-Along-Adventures entry) from US Issue 47.
The stories were first printed in the UK in The Empire Strikes Back Weekly 136-139 and The Empire Strikes Back Monthlies 140 and 142.  Sitting behind a dazzling cover by Paul Neary (who among other achievements would go on to become editor-in-chief of Marvel UK in the 1990s) the annual would be the last before the final chapter in the second Star Wars trilogy arrived.
Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson would return to complete the saga after their stellar work on Empire and the weekly magazine strips with Return of the Jedi, reprinting the Marvel Super Special and 4 part Limited Series (one of Marvel US’s first) which had already been released in the UK in the first 8 issues of the renamed UK weekly, renumbered and renamed Return of the Jedi Weekly.  Released by Marvel/Grandreams and lying behind the same Bill Sienkiewicz cover that graced the Super Special, it was a big seller and along with the RCA soundtrack, Read-Along-Adventure and Futura novelisation it truly brought the grandeur of the final chapter home to UK fans in 1983.
1984 was a busy year for Star Wars, with the release of The Ewok Adventure on US television, arriving in the UK and Europe on the big screen as Caravan of Courage.  The 1984 Return of the Jedi Annual gave us a striking Glynis Wein cover collaging images from Jedi and collecting  ”Chanteuse of the Stars” from US Issue 77, “The Big Con” from Issue 79 and “Ellie” from US issue 80.  Printed here in the UK in Return of the Jedi Weekly between issues 20 – 43, the three stories all written by Mary Jo Duffy and drawn by Ron Frenz and Tom Palmer make up one of the strongest of the UK annuals, the heart-breaking “Ellie” particularly standing out as a strong tale.  The striking final panel of a tearful See Threepio stays long in the memory.
1984 also brought a collection behind a Jolly John Higgins cover that pulled together the adaptations of both Empire and Jedi.  Unique in that it was a Marks and Spencers exclusive it was tougher to find but a treat for fans of Goodwin and Williamson.
By 1985, while Star Wars was still in full swing with Ewoks and Droids both on air and a second Ewoks television movie released in the UK on video via MGM, the shadow of the Dark Times was near.  The Kenner line was rapidly fading into the bargain bins, the whole tone of the Star Wars line had become very much a young childs arena and with George Lucas putting the saga on ice to concentrate on other pursuits the Star Wars galaxy approaching a period of hibernation.  The 1985 Annual collected the first issue of Star Comics Ewoks title “The Rainbow Bridge” (written by David Manak and drawn by Warren Kremer) along with 1983′s US Annual #3 “The Apprentice” (written by long-time writer and editor Mary Jo Duffy and drawn by Klaus Janson).  Released by Marvel/Grandreams, it would be the last in an almost unbroken run of 9 annuals in 8 years, the last in the first age of Star Wars.  But not the last Annual by Marvel UK.
By 1988 we were deep in the midsts of The Dark Times.  In 1987 West End Games had launched The Roleplay Game to great acclaim by roleplayers but Return of the Jedi Weekly had ended with its 155th issue on 7th June 1986, relegating Star Wars to a back-up strip in Spider-Man and Zoids weekly.  Ewoks had continued as a title, capturing the kids market but by 1988 even that had ended.  This final Marvel UK Annual compiled two comic strip adventures “The Undwerwater Kingdom” from issue 9 of Star Comics run and “Rites of POwer” from issue 2 along with the prose tales “Chief Chirpa Kidnapped!”, “Return of the Great One!” and “The Ice Princess”.  It marked the end of a 10 year association between Star Wars and Marvel in the UK, a pairing that brought the magic of Star Wars to young UK fans every week and via these iconic Annuals made our Star Wars memories even more awesome.

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Back in the ’70s and ’80s, Marvel UK was one of the keystones in keeping the spirit of the Star Wars saga alive between the release of the films. Once each year, comic book fans would be treated to even more Star Wars in the form of special over-sized releases: hardback annuals.

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Drawing from the Present: Familiar Creatures in a Galaxy Far, Far Away

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I told you ’bout the dino and me. You know that we’re as close as can be. Well, here’s another clue for you all…

While no man has ever seen a dinosaur from the mesozoic era, other animals from the Star Wars universe are actually very familiar to us. The absence of Earth is an important element in Star Wars‘ status as fantasy and space opera. Jocasta Nu would say: “Earth simply does not exist.” But several elements from our own planet have nevertheless slipped into that galaxy far, far away. Indigenous lifeforms from Earth (humans for example) are one of these elements.
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Caravan of the Force Day 11: Return of the Jedi (News)

James Burns & Mark Newbold | August 12, 2013

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Star Wars Celebration Europe was over before it began and Sunday at 5:00 p.m. came far too quickly. We said our goodbyes to all the friends we only see at Celebrations around the world, knowing that the next fan gathering would take place in Anaheim in April 2015. We loaded Slave-2 and squeezed the vehicle out from the stand, made arrangements to pick up Maureen and Jeremy at 09:30 the following morning, and headed back to our hotel to rest our weary heads before the next day’s long drive back to the UK.

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StarWars.com Weekly Roundup: August 9, 2013

StarWars.com Team | August 9, 2013

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Wondering what’s been happening at StarWars.com? Here’s a quick roundup of what you might have missed this week!

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